How To Reduce Breast Cancer

This is a sponsored post in partnership with Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program.

Finding out that a loved one has cancer not only affects the person. It also impacts their family and friends. For years, I’ve had family members and long-time friends who’ve been diagnosed with cancer. Watching their body slowly give in to the sickness can be devastating.

When I heard about the opportunity to share my thoughts through a survey conducted for the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP) I said yes to participating.

As one of the primary caregivers to my children, I’m always looking for ways to stay healthy and eat right. Regardless of eating right, there are other factors to consider with it comes to breast cancer.  One of them is the environment and how it may impact the way our bodies develop.  

The BCERP, which is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is made up of a group of scientists, physicians, and community partners. These researchers study the effects of environmental exposures on breast cancer risk later in lifeBCERP has a number of resources for parents and families on how to reduce risk. One of these resources includes a mother-daughter toolkit that mothers can use to discuss the steps with their daughters to reduce cancer risk. 

If you’d like to participate in the survey for the BCERP, click here

BCERP has additional resources you may be interested in sharing with your loved ones. You can access these resources here: http://bit.ly/BCERPmaterials.
These include the following documents:

General Information Flyer: http://bit.ly/BCERPFlyer
Flyer for Hispanic Spanish-Speaking Populations: http://bit.ly/BCERPSpanishFlyer
Flyer for AfricanAmerican Populations: http://bit.ly/BCERPAAFlyer

Print Advertisement (PSA) “Dear Mom: It’s me, your daughter.”:

Story Ideas for Community Members: http://bit.ly/BCERPStoryIdeas

PLEASE NOTE: BCERP’s education materials are based on scientific evidence and available free to the public. However, BCERP has guidelines and requirements when using their documents, which can be accessed here: https://bcerp.org/educational-materials/customization.

Be sure to check out the mother-daughter toolkit and share it with a friend. It’s free — so share away! 

Leave a Reply