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How I Went From SAHM To WAHM

Finding out you’re about to be a parent can scary, more so when it wasn’t expected. You can read more about my journey into motherhood on my About page and in this post.

It wasn’t until my husband and I decided it would be best to move to South Florida and raise our family in the Sunshine State that it really hit me. I was going to leave behind everything I knew since birth. Family, friends, and the start of my career as an editor and marketer.

I had been working for a digital B2B publishing company for almost three years before heading down to Florida. It was a great place to grow and learn from those before me.

Transitioning To A SAHM

Although the move left me unemployed, I was determined to make something out of this new life. With the title of a stay-at-home mom (SAHM) framed across my forehead, I wanted more. In fact, I needed more.

My husband continued his career in finance and has been able to strive in South Florida. Great, right? My husband has always been supportive of all my decision, but I couldn’t say the same about myself.

During the first six months since our move, we bumped heads a lot. I cried often and didn’t like my new role. I felt stuck. Wouldn’t you?

After working for years and being independent, I was now a SAHM. I felt like I was dumped into another part of the world and forced to figure things out. The truth is, that’s how it feels like when you’re a first-time parent. You’re given a new role and you feel the need to excel in it.

Much of my frustrations came from not knowing what to do with a six-month-old in a new place. I joined a lot of local mom groups and went to events to socialize our firstborn — and myself.

I had started Motherhood Through My Eyes before moving to South Florida and had a good following — mainly family and long-time friends — but it wasn’t until we made the move that I began to heavily focus on turning it into a hobby that would pay off (literally).

Making A Career Out Of Motherhood
Becoming a SAHM was a blessing in disguise. I just didn’t see it at first, but that feeling of being stuck was mental. I had a new place to explore and a little one who was learning about the world. I challenged my emotions by transitioning them into the feeling of curiosity. We could take on the world together, and that’s what we did. We took on the blogosphere. I researched ideas whenever our little guy was busy napping, coloring, or playing with his toys.

At first, we received a lot of hosted opportunities — non-paid opportunities for our family to enjoy free of charge. We attended local events and visited museums.

The funny thing about being a SAHM is that you never really stay home. You’re always out and about doing something.

The more I asked questions, the more I learned. I combed through blog posts on ways to generate an income as a blogger. After months of research and two years of trial and error, I began freelancing for other bloggers, helping them with their campaigns as well as my own. I didn’t get as many campaigns at first, so it was nice to make extra income from helping others achieve their goals.

Today, I continue to use my blog as a business and have expanded helping businesses, as well as local bloggers, reach their target audience. Although I have a tough time considering what I do as “work”, most people would consider me a work-at-home mom (WAHM). It’s exciting to know that I can do what I’ve always loved — writing and developing marketing strategies — while hanging with my family all day.

Do you know someone who is a SAHM and needs a little inspiration to follow their dreams? Share this post with them!


Former B2B editor and marketer turned Family & Lifestyle blogger. Fatima is passionate about life and being social. When she isn't running around with her husband, three kids, and two pups, Fatima helps other bloggers and local businesses with their online marketing strategy. If you have any questions or would like to connect, feel free to reach out via email: tima@motherhoodthroughmyeyes.com

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